Category: Better Your English

Five Pairs of Homographs You Ought to Know

Homographs, homonyms and homophones might make the English language funny and intriguing, but beyond a shadow of a doubt, they give a tough time to learners who don’t have English as their native language. Even native speakers, at times, tend to struggle with them, but being native, they are naturally inclined to understand them without having to get into the nitty-gritties. However, when they face challenges, they do try to seek help from reliable sources.

Ten Phrasal Verbs With ‘Look’

If you look up the word ‘look’ in a good dictionary, you will end up finding close to thirty meanings. And this word, like many words in English, can function as both a noun and a verb. We, therefore, suggest you click on the link given at the end of this post to get to know all the meanings of this commonly used word. In this post, nevertheless, we have listed ten phrasal verbs with ‘look’ that we feel you ought to know as a learner of the English language. Also, we have stated all the meanings of the phrasal verbs and given several example sentences.

What’s the Difference Between ‘Will’ and ‘Shall’?

In this post, our focus will be on explaining the key differences between the modal verbs ‘will’ and ‘shall’. Many students have the misconception (a wrong opinion) that we use ‘will’ with the second person (you) and third person (he, she, they, it) pronouns and ‘shall’ with the first person pronouns, namely ‘I’ and ‘we’. And while it is true that ‘will’ can be used with any pronoun to denote a future course of action, there are some situations when we cannot use ‘will’. Doing so may not only change the meaning of the sentence, but the sentence may end up being grammatically incorrect as well.

Key Differences Between Simple Past Tense and Present Perfect Tense

We generally use the present perfect tense to talk about actions that have a link with the present. Nonetheless, it is also possible to use the past tense to express such actions. Also, the adverbs ‘just’, ‘recently’ and ‘lately’ can be used to denote that the action being spoken about happened in the recent past. It is also possible to use the adverb ‘already’ to denote that the action is completed. However, if the sentence happens to be negative, we oftentimes use the adverb ‘yet’ provided the sentence is said in the present perfect tense. Look at the example sentences given below:

Five English Word Sets That Confuse Every Learner

While ‘price’ denotes the cost of something, ‘prize’ denotes ‘an award offered or won in a competition’. Interestingly, when used as a noun, ‘price’ can also mean ‘a reward offered for capturing or killing a criminal or terrorist’.

Everything About Subject-Verb Agreement

Subject-verb agreement is a grammatical concept according to which there must be a formal agreement or concord between the subject of a sentence (which can be a noun or pronoun) and its verb. This concept, therefore, can also be called ‘verb conjugation’.

Ten Interesting Phrasal Verbs With ‘Play’

Do you know that a good dictionary will give you close to forty meanings of the word ‘play’? Yes, you read that right! You might also find it interesting to note that this cool word is actually derived from the Dutch word ‘plien’, which means ‘to leap for joy’ or ‘to rejoice’. Nevertheless, I don’t think I’d be wrong in saying you will have used this word in more than one way while indulging in generic conversations.

Ten Idioms You Might Want to Use While Conversing

Using idioms while confabulating is the hallmark of a proficient speaker. If you’re looking forward to enhancing your level of vocabulary, then the list of idioms given in this post can surely be of great help to you. I have chosen ten commonly used idioms that you might want to use in day-to-day conversations.